Logo  
  | home | authors | calendar colophon | links | newsgroups | newsfeed | new | printer version |  
volume 3
september 2000

Rare pictures from radio's past

 





  Radio London: 16. "A Day In The Life"
by Gerry Bishop, Hans Knot and John S. Platt
Previous
  When the threat of the Marine Offences Act came to the fore, Radio London was prepared to continue broadcasting. However on 28th July 1967 the following press release was issued by the managing director, Philip Birch: "It is with deep regret that, after nearly three years of broadcasting, Radio London will be closing down on August 15th." At 3.00pm on 14th August 1967, the station closed with the final record being "A Day In The Life" of The Beatles.
 
1

Account of Radio London's close-down in the papers of 15th August 1967 (click on the picture for a larger piece of the article)

   
2 At the end of May 1967 three transmitter valves were delivered to the ship by the tender company who had received them from the English Electric Valve Co. This was in readiness for continuing broadcasting after the Marine Offences Act came into effect, each valve having a life of about a year. However on 28th July 1967 the following press release was issued by the managing director, Philip Birch; "It is with deep regret that, after nearly three years of broadcasting, Radio London will be closing down on August 15th. It is unfortunate that this Government's attitude towards independent radio has consistently been one of suppression as part of a determined plan to continue the Government's monopoly in radio broadcasting. Radio London has repeatedly pointed out that the British public could benefit from dozens of independent radio stations operating under licence on land, but the Government has said no. This is in spite of the fact that the Prime Minister has in his possession a study by National Opinion Polls that shows that 69% of the population are in favour of allowing the free radio stations to continue broadcasting. We understand that the new Government Programme, which will be called Radio 1, is largely modelled on Radio London and will employ many Radio London DJ's. We receive hundreds of thousands of letters from listeners but possibly this Government imitation is the greatest tribute of all!"
Listen to Radio London's last day of broadcasting (14.8.1967)
   
3 Radio London's deejays arrive in Felixstowe on 14th August 1967
  The nine DJ's and three engineers on board were taken to Felixstowe by the Ocean Cock. From there they went to Ipswich to catch a train for London. On their arrival at Liverpool Street they found a crowd of more than a thousand waiting to greet them and they had to fight their way to waiting taxis. Next, they all went their own way.
   
4

Photo in the British papers, showing fans awaiting the Radio London DJ's in London (14/8/67)

   
5 When the station closed down, it left no debts. The station itself had cost about 500,000 British Pounds to set up and with advertising running at 70,000 British Pounds per month this was soon covered. However, there were very many disappointed listeners, missing their favorite station. The estimated audience of Radio London was 12,000,000 in the British Isles, with a further 4,000,000 in Europe. Further information is contained in this press release: "Few people who enjoy the sound of Big 'L' realise that Radio London is a converted minesweeper that once saved 500 men and disposed of just as many lethal mines. The 'Galaxy' was a guardian angel to these men and now, after yet another stage of her life — as a cargo ship — the ship throbs to the sound of artistes from all over the world. After her role as a cargo ship, the ship went to Miami and was fitted out with a 75 kW Ampliphase transmitter and shunt fed 212 feet high mast (23 feet higher than Nelson's Column) giving 75,000 watts power. This has enabled Radio London to reach a broadcasting range covering England and Wales, and is now the most powerful of all radio ship transmitters. Besides covering most of Britain, music from the 'Galaxy' is heard by millions of people, as far afield as Sweden, Norway, Holland, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, France and Italy."
   
6

Photo in the British papers, showing fans awaiting the Radio London DJ's on Liverpool Street station, London (14/8/67)

   
7

Pete Drummond at Liverpool Street Station (14/8/1967)

   
8

Crying receptionist at hearing close-down (14/8/1967)

   
9

Ian Daimon giving signatures at Liverpool Street Station (14/8/1967)

   
10

Fans at Liverpool Street Station (14/8/1967)

   
11

Next to the photo above an article was printed (click on the picture for an enlargment)

   
12
  Dutch paper reports about the end of Radio London (Haagsche Post 28th July 1967)
   
14
  Protests 14/8/67
   
15

Protest leaflett

   
16

Protest leaflett

   
17

Protest demonstration against government, 1967

   
18
  Will Radio London turn to the Netherlands? (click on the picture for a larger piece of this article)
Dutch programmes on Radio London?
   
19

Photo showing studio to test Dutch deejays

   
Previous
  The sound fragments on this page are copyrighted. They are used here according to the rules of fair use and academic quoting. Look here for other pictures and documents of Radio London (1964-1967).
  2000 © Soundscapes